1. 13:30 28th Jul 2014

    Notes: 48211

    Reblogged from calliotrope

    Tags: cue queueawesome women

    lucymontero:

lexkixass:

mooglemisbehaving:

gogogadgetgoatkins:

Mary Bowser, former slave of the Van Lew family, infiltrated the Confederacy by working as a servant in the household of Jefferson Davis. Bowser was assumed to be illiterate, and as a black woman was below suspicion. Practically invisible, she was able to listen to conversations between Confederate officials and read sensitive documents, gathering information that she handed over to the Union.
(From National Woman’s History Museum Facebook Page)

This needs to be a movie. Like, now.

I’d watch this movie.

How is this not a movie?

    lucymontero:

    lexkixass:

    mooglemisbehaving:

    gogogadgetgoatkins:

    Mary Bowser, former slave of the Van Lew family, infiltrated the Confederacy by working as a servant in the household of Jefferson Davis. Bowser was assumed to be illiterate, and as a black woman was below suspicion. Practically invisible, she was able to listen to conversations between Confederate officials and read sensitive documents, gathering information that she handed over to the Union.

    (From National Woman’s History Museum Facebook Page)

    This needs to be a movie. Like, now.

    I’d watch this movie.

    How is this not a movie?

    (Source: gogogadgetgoat)

     
  2. 13:30 27th Jul 2014

    Notes: 6799

    Reblogged from fer1972

    Tags: cue queueartbooks

    fer1972:

    Stunning Book Art by Thomas Wightman

     
  3. [Fantastic fiction] is accused of giving children a false impression of the world they live in But I think no literature that children could read gives them less of a false impression. I think what profess to be realistic stories for children are far more likely to deceive them. I never expected the real world to be like the fairy tales. I think that I did expect school to be like the school stories. The fantasies did not deceive me: the school stories did.

    …Do fairy tales teach children to retreat into a world of wish-fulfilment ‘fantasy’ in the technical psychological sense of the word—instead of facing the problems of the real world? …Let us again lay the fairy tale side by side with the school story or any other story which is labelled a ‘Boy’s Book’ or a ‘Girl’s Book’, as distinct from a `Children’s Book’. There is no doubt that both arouse, and imaginatively satisfy, wishes. We long to go through the looking glass, to reach fairy land. We also long to be the immensely popular and successful schoolboy or schoolgirl, or the lucky boy or girl who discovers the spy’s plot or rides the horse that none of the cowboys can manage. But the two longings are very different. The second, especially when directed on something so close as school life, is ravenous and deadly serious. …We run to it from the disappointments and humiliations of the real world: it sends us back to the real world undivinely discontented. For it is all flattery to the ego. The pleasure consists in picturing oneself the object of admiration.

    The other longing, that for fairy land, is very different. In a sense a child does not long for fairy land as a boy longs to be the hero of the first eleven. Does anyone suppose that he really and prosaically longs for all the dangers and discomforts of a fairy tale?—really wants dragons in contemporary England? It is not so. It would be much truer to say that fairy land arouses a longing for he knows not what. It stirs and troubles him (to his life-long enrichment) with the dim sense of something beyond his reach and, far from dulling or emptying the actual world, gives it a new dimension of depth. …The boy reading the school story of the type I have in mind desires success and is unhappy (once the book is over) because he can’t get it: the boy reading the fairy tale desires and is happy in the very fact of desiring. For his mind has not been concentrated on himself, as it often is in the more realistic story.

    I do not mean that school stories for boys and girls ought not to be written. I am only saying that they are far more liable to become ‘fantasies’ in the clinical sense than fantastic stories are. And this distinction holds for adult reading too. The dangerous fantasy is always superficially realistic. The real victim of wishful reverie does not batten on the Odyssey, The Tempest, or The Worm Ouroboros: he (or she) prefers stories about millionaires, irresistible beauties, posh hotels, palm beaches and bedroom scenes—things that really might happen, that ought to happen, that would have happened if the reader had had a fair chance. For, as I say, there are two kinds of longing. The one is an askesis, a spiritual exercise, and the other is a disease.
    — C. S. Lewis, “On Three Ways of Writing for Children
     
  4. 13:30 25th Jul 2014

    Notes: 8286

    Reblogged from calliotrope

    Tags: cue queueartgorgeousness

     
  5. toothlessismypatronus:

    A to Z characteristics | Disney girls (not including Pixar) • insp

     
  6. 13:30 23rd Jul 2014

    Notes: 46426

    Reblogged from tastefullyoffensive

    Tags: cue queueartcomic

    tastefullyoffensive:

    Ways to Sit on Couches [cheese3d]

     
  7. 13:30 22nd Jul 2014

    Notes: 18893

    Reblogged from dduane

    Tags: cue queueart

     
  8. RPF has existed for as long as there have been celebrities. Any media ‘based on a true story!’ is RPF. Any historical fiction narrative that co-opts a real person or real group is RPF. Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar is RPF, and reflects reality just as accurately as the better and more lovingly, carefully written internet RPF of today: virtually not at all. The names remain - Julius Caesar, Mark Antony - as do certain simplified traits, the archetypal roles they play. In lieu of actual Julius Caesar and Actual Mark Antony, we get AU!Caesar and an AU!Antony in a simpler, more dramatic narrative.
    — V. Arrow, “Real Person(a) Fiction,” in Fic: Why Fanfiction is Taking Over the World  (via silencewhippersnapper)
     
  9. 13:30 20th Jul 2014

    Notes: 145537

    Reblogged from happyhanabi

    Tags: cue queuereference?blood

    liathwen:

    salomeideal:

    8point6seconds:

    adventuresintimeandspace:

    Here are some scientific facts about blood loss for all you psychopaths writers out there.

    I would like to know what is in those bottles. 

    It’s Siracha!!!! Siracha is life!

    That’s actually highly useful.

     
  10. 10:17

    Notes: 36000

    Reblogged from flyingwide

    Tags: intoit

    nakedwithanovel:

    Shout out to muscular men that are still kinda chubby

    Y’all are slept on so much but idk why

    That lumberjack build does things to me

    I like knowing I can cuddle with you but you can still fuck someone up

    (Source: wittsandtitts)